Iconic places

Iconic places

They have a long past, make sure they have a living future.

As a continent, Australia is ancient and remarkable. But within this land there are a collection of very special places that are unique on a global scale. These iconic places are ancient, unique and at risk from current threats such as climate change, mining and deforestation.

With their rich evolutionary history, abundance of unique flora and fauna, and deep significance for First Nations people, these places deserve respect—and care. Together, we can help them have not only a long past, but a living future.

Remarkable locations

Australia is a continent of incredible diversity, with landscapes ranging from rainforests to deserts, all home to a staggering array of species found nowhere else on the planet. The remarkable places we are working to protect are all globally significant because of the unique biodiversity they support.

WA Jarrah Forests

WA Jarrah Forests

The Jarrah forests in the South-West corner of WA carry within them an evolutionary story that reaches back tens of thousands of years, making many species that live there precious relics of an ancient time.

Lake Eyre Basin

Lake Eyre Basin

The vast Lake Eyre Basin comprises Kati Thanda, Munga-Thirri / Simpson Desert and Channel Country. It's an incredibly diverse landscape where intact deserts and sometimes vast wetlands support hundreds of species and millions of birds.

Kimberley & Martuwarra

Kimberley & Martuwarra

Stunning landscapes, meandering rivers, vast marine sanctuaries—the Kimberley is home to life found nowhere else on Earth. It’s no place for fossil fuel mega-projects or vast water extractions.

Great Australian Bight

Great Australian Bight

Together we've done it! In February 2020, Equinor backed out of the pristine waters of the Great Australian Bight. And in 2021, Santos has also abandoned its plans. For our climate, coastal communities & wildlife, we must keep this beautiful area safe.

Forests of lutruwita / Tasmania

Forests of lutruwita / Tasmania

These forests support some of the most iconic (and peculiar) species on the planet. They are home to 1000-year-old Gondwanan conifer trees and store more carbon than most. Incredibly they are still subject to clear-fell logging. We’re fighting for their protection.

Victoria's tall forests

Victoria's tall forests

It sounds ridiculous because it is. Victoria’s last great forests–in East Gippsland and the Central Highlands–are being turned into cheap office paper and worthless wood chips. We’re proposing an alternative ending.

Wollemi

Wollemi

Forming part of the vast Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area, Wollemi National Park is home to many unique species, including the last wild stands of the Wollemi pine.